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4 Simple Ways To Be More Resilient

resiliencere·sil·ient  (r-zlynt) adj.

Marked by the ability to recover readily, as from misfortune.

Most people will tell you that the opposite of being depressed is simply to be happy. The fact is however, no one can be in a constant state of happiness. Life will throw little and big surprises and shocks or way constantly. It is how you handle these situations that is important. Do you fall into a deep dark tunnel of depression when things do not work out, or do you cope with these minor bumps and recover easily without falling apart? The opposite of being depressed is actually being resilient. This happens when we build a protective layer to safeguard ourselves from becoming overwhelmed and depressed from the difficulties of life. Here are some ways that will help you be more resilient and cope better with life.

1. Positive Relationships

In order for humans to thrive and be happy, we constantly need people around us. Positive relationships like lovers, spouses, sibling and parents all contribute to our well-being. Studies have shown how social involvement can promote better health, help in the recovery from trauma and illness and lower mental illness and stress-related health problems. Many studies have shown how people recover from physical and mental illness when assigned to support groups. Always have positive people around you who will help lift you up when you are down. These people are your support group, people you find inspiration from to bounce back when you feel down.

2. Sleep

The lack of sleep can cause a person to become irrational. When sleep deprivation becomes chronic, it is bad news all the way. Your memory and concentration can be affected. It can also cause a decline in cognitive performance which translates into an intoxicated brain. Summarized, the lack of sleep can cause mood disorders and a host of other problems and illnesses. When your body gets sufficient rest through sleep, your mind is able to concentrate better, recover better and be more positive.

3. Diet

If you want to improve your emotional health, listen to your mind and not your mouth the next time you eat something. The bad boys like high sugar, caffeine, alcohol, and processed foods need to leave your kitchen and be replaced with the good guys like protein, lots of fresh fruit and vegetables, superfoods and some raw chocolate that actually helps boost your serotonin levels. When you start doing this, you will start to see the difference in your mood and attitude every time you replace the bad food with a better option. A good diet will also make you feel more energetic and this way you will be able to handle stress better.

4. Exercise

A study was conducted with 202 depressed people who were assigned sessions of vigorous aerobic exercise. The shocking results were as follows:

  • The aerobic exercise was as effective as Zoloft, an anti-depressant.
  • The ones who improved with exercise were less likely to relapse after a period of 10 months than those who were successfully treated with anti-depressants.

A short 20 minute exercise routine early in the morning is a sure way to boost mental health. I have seen colleagues walking into the office slumped and grumpy and others who are happy and chirpy. No guesses to tell who exercised that morning! A study conducted with 20,000 participants revealed that people who were more active, doing things like gardening, exercise, walking, housework and sports, were the ones who were least anxious and distressed. When we exercise, the workout stimulates brain chemicals that foster the growth of nerve cells. Exercise also increases the activity of serotonin and norepinephrine. It also releases endorphins or happy hormones which also reduce pain. With so many benefits of exercising related to mental health, why would you not start today?

Build a more resilient you today!

About Genius Awakening

Genius Awakening was created to lead people to a better understanding of self and others in order to navigate our world at a higher and more awakened level of being. Together we will explore the depths of consciousness in order to evolve beyond our current paradigms into a world of love, joy and peace. Oksana and Larry Ostrovsky are passionate guides of this space.
  • cornishfaerie

    Re: “Do you fall into a deep dark tunnel of depression when things do not
    work out your way, or do you cope with these minor bumps and recover
    easily without falling apart? The opposite of being depressed is
    actually being resilient. This happens when we build a protective layer
    to safeguard ourselves from becoming overwhelmed and depressed from the
    difficulties of life. Here are some ways that will help you be more
    resilient and cope better with life.”

    Your understanding of depression is beyond reprehensible (“things do not work out your way”? You’re comparing normal life issues that everyone experiences with depression? Beyond stupid). It is astonishingly ignorant and insulting to anyone who actually knows the truth (e.g., those with it, psychiatrists, therapists, care-takers, family members, …). Those with severe mental illness are actually stronger than you think because not only do they have normal issues they also have to fight abnormal issues (caused by VISIBLE signs in brain scans). I still cannot understand how you call yourselves ‘Genius Awakening’ and yet you misunderstand so many things about health (that I’ve already pointed out) and indeed intelligence.

    Re: “Summarized, the lack of sleep can cause mood disorders and a host of other problems and illnesses.”
    Welcome to 2014 where this is as old as… dirt… it does far more than that and that is long known too.

    Re: “The bad boys like chocolate and sugar, caffeine, alcohol, and processed
    food need to leave your kitchen and be replaced with the good guys like
    protein, fresh fruit and vegetables, and whole food.

    Yet, chocolate actually can help (but again: help/treat, not cure). Same with caffeine (oh the irony…). I wonder why that might be with it being a psychostimulant? Funny also how you recently talked about how marijuana is a good thing for clarity and mental health (if nothing else, clarity/similar… and there is even more irony here that I will not point out), isn’t it? Oh, but I WILL point out: yes, those foods are better for you but it isn’t magic and the same thing goes for cholesterol (you know, cardiac diseases run in the family…so diet alone isn’t always the way to go and in fact some times it is not helpful at all). By the way, you do realise (sorry, I don’t use American but I do use English) that carbohydrates – which includes sugars – is a necessary part of the diet, right? It’s simple: a balanced diet is what you need. You can have all the junk you want and still lose weight yet it still isn’t healthy. You can also do the reverse: have really healthy food but have too much and be overweight or obese (and so not healthy). You can also have too much of a certain type of food, over other types, and it isn’t healthy (go figure, what with it being “balanced” and all..). But that goes to show how stupid simple diet is (so simple and stupid yet people still cannot understand it).

    Re:”A study was conducted with 202 depressed people who were assigned
    sessions of vigorous aerobic exercise. The shocking results were as
    follows:”

    202? Really, that tiny sample size brings “shocking” results to you? Unbelievably … stupid. And depressed people means very little. Severity? Major depressive disorder? There’s also milder forms of depression (try dysthymia and try it combined with major depressive disorder). There’s also people who aren’t experiencing depression but are simply down, grieving, etc. There’s also other factors (see below). I would give you the benefit of the doubt (and suggest we’re talking one group of some severity) except that a sample size of 202 is … useless (and so by extension it really doesn’t matter).

    Re: “The aerobic exercise was as effective as Zoloft, an anti-depressant.”

    Yes, it can help but you are missing some very important things:
    – comorbidity
    – severity
    – DOSAGE (including different body mass of patients) of drugS (yes, plural. Again, welcome to basics 101)
    – therapy at the same time (same thing as above)
    – coping mechanisms (as you actually refer to but fail to put together correctly)
    – do I really need to point out any more of the blatantly obvious things to consider? Really? Pathetic.

    “The depressives who improved with exercise were less likely to
    relapse after a period of 10 months than those who were successfully
    treated with anti-depressants.”

    Less likely means nothing. Next you’re going to tell us that probability is the same thing as chance, right? Oh, wait…

    Besides that, 10 months is small, very small indeed, time frame. Don’t believe me? I guess if you’re 1 year old it might be a long time but… at 1 year old you won’t have the understanding of this anyway.

    Bottom line: No, depression is not the opposite of resilience. Mental illness in general is not the opposite of resilience. Not unless you believe a dictionary’s definition of mental health problems (and only a fool believes a dictionary on medical things, period. Same for technology, science, arts, …).